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BBC Earth Podcast

BBC Earth Podcast

BBC Earth

Each week the BBC Earth podcast brings you entertainment, humour, an abundance of amazing animal stories and unbelievable unheard sounds. Explore the world of animals with superpowers, deep dive into death, hear from heroes passionately protecting the planet and get expert insights into corners of the natural world you’ve never explored before.


Hosted by zoologists Rutendo Shackleton and Sebastian Echeverri, each episode features special guests including the world’s most respected scientists and naturalists, stars of film and television, nature Instagrammers and more.


Listen, laugh and learn – whether you’re a nature lover, nature curious or haven’t yet realised nature is for you, there’ll be a story here to captivate your ears.



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39 - Safari
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  • 39 - Safari

    You don’t need to be on an African Savanna to enjoy a safari. Rutendo and Sebastian explore how to have a nature adventure wherever you are.  


    On the isle of Bute in Scotland, Nature Instagrammer Lucy Lapwing takes us on an immersive walk through her local woodland. It’s a wonderfully damp, fresh day, and the forest is dripping with lichen and bright lime green moss as Lucy points out local birds and wildlife. 


    Rutendo and Sebastian go in search of spiders in Bristol, and with the ingenious use of an electric toothbrush, tempt a rather large specimen out of a city wall.  

    Their special guest is Eric Stonestreet, the Emmy award-winning actor best known for playing Cameron Tucker in the ABC mockumentary sitcom Modern Family. A huge nature-fan, Eric describes some of his favourite animal encounters.


    And finally, we hear how patience and stillness are key to noticing the amazing nature all around us, as sound recordist Melissa Pons shares some of her haunting recordings of wolves in Portugal.


    Credits

    The BBC Earth podcast is presented by Sebastian Echeverri and Rutendo Shackleton . This episode was produced by Rachel Byrne and Geoff Marsh. The researchers were Seb Masters and Dawood Quereshi. The Production Manager was Catherine Stringer, the Production Co-ordinator was Gemma Wootton, and the Project Co-ordinator was Linda Barber. Podcast Theme Music was composed by Axel Kacoutié, with mixing and additional sound design by Peregrine Andrews. The Associate Producer is Cristen Caine and the Executive Producer is Deborah Dudgeon. 


    Special thanks to… 

    Interviewee Eric Stonestreet.Lucy Lapwing for her report from the Isle of Bute.  Field recordist Melissa Pons for the wolf soundscape.

    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Mon, 03 Oct 2022 - 34min
  • 38 - Series trailer

    Each week the BBC Earth podcast brings you entertainment, humour, an abundance of amazing animal stories and unbelievable unheard sounds. Explore the world of animals with superpowers, deep dive into death, hear from heroes passionately protecting the planet and get expert insights into corners of the natural world you’ve never explored before.

    Hosted by zoologists Rutendo Shackleton and Sebastian Echeverri, each episode features special guests including the world’s most respected scientists and naturalists, stars of film and television, nature Instagrammers and more.

    Listen, laugh and learn – whether you’re a nature lover, nature curious or haven’t yet realised nature is for you, there’ll be a story here to captivate your ears.



    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Mon, 26 Sep 2022 - 2min
  • 37 - Finding what doesn't want to be found

    In the final episode of series 4, we’re digging into some of the more elusive corners of our planet. To begin, we’re on a bear hunt deep in the Bornean rainforest. Guiding us is Siew Te Wong, who is the world’s foremost authority on a bear we know very little about. The sun bear is the smallest bear in the world and, as Wong has discovered for himself, tracking them can draw up some unexpected discoveries. Next we’re turning our attention upwards, to the sky at night. Or, to be more precise, to the sounds that come from it. Magnus Robb explores what birdsong can tell us about the extraordinary migration routes of these animals. To end, we sit still to see the visible changes over time to our glaciers. Using past and present technology, Kieran Baxter brings to life some of the unprecedented declines in our natural world. Thank you for listening to another series of the BBC Earth podcast. As ever, we love hearing from you on social media, so do share with us your favourite episode so far or a story that amazed, surprised or moved you… Website: www.bbcearth.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/bbcearth/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/bbcearth/ Twitter: www.twitter.com/bbcearth   


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    Tue, 13 Apr 2021 - 32min
  • 36 - Saving the world's rarest marine mammal

    In this episode, we’re delving into the topic of extinction. We'll be finding out about some of the animals who are critically endangered, meeting the people trying to rescue them, and exploring species who may be able to make miraculous comebacks. Perhaps one of the most endangered species is the vaquita, a small sea mammal with a population of less than 20. We hear from some extraordinary people weathering threats and tragedies in an attempt to bring these ‘pandas of the ocean’ back from the brink.  According to US Department of Agriculture researcher, Dr Samuel Ramsey, every discovery is built upon a discovery that came before it. Yet some of those discoveries can be found in the most unexpected of places. For Samuel, understanding his father’s health issues provided the key to discovering why honeybee populations are on the decrease. And to finish, we’re asking one of the biggest questions in paleontology: how did birds evolve from dinosaurs? To help us explore this topic, we’ve got the help of Jingmai O’Connor whose work in China has helped shed light on the distant link between the extinct dinosaur and ballooning bird populations. Thank you for listening to another series of the BBC Earth podcast. As ever, we love hearing from you on social media, so do share with us your favourite episode so far or a story that amazed, surprised or moved you… Website: www.bbcearth.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/bbcearth/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/bbcearth/ Twitter: www.twitter.com/bbcearth   


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    Tue, 06 Apr 2021 - 32min
  • 35 - The artists of the animal kingdom

    In this episode, we’re displaying the most impressive artists of the animal kingdom. From tiny visual masterpieces, to animals that can dance to a beat, we’re shining a spotlight on the art that can be found in nature. Deep in the Amazon rainforest, there’s a tiny structure that (if you’re able to spot it) catches your eye. The intricate silk henge is a mini masterpiece, and for some time nobody could say exactly what it was or why it existed. Phil Torres takes us on his journey of discovery and demystification. Next we’re exploring whether animals can dance to a beat and, if so, why? To help us try and answer that, we hear from Henkjan Honing, professor of Music Cognition at the University of Amsterdam.  Finally, we turn our attention to Northern Australia’s great bowerbird. What can the males' elaborate constructions teach us about perspective? Thank you for listening to another series of the BBC Earth podcast. As ever, we love hearing from you on social media, so do share with us your favourite episode so far or a story that amazed, surprised or moved you… Website: www.bbcearth.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/bbcearth/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/bbcearth/ Twitter: www.twitter.com/bbcearth   


    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Tue, 30 Mar 2021 - 28min
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